Fettucce with green tomatoes, bacon, and prawns - Diversivore.com

Fettuccine with Green Tomatoes, Bacon, and Prawns

In Recipe by Sean4 Comments

Green Tomato Fettuccine

With Bacon & Prawns

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Don’t get me wrong – a juicy, ripe, red tomato is a thing of glory.  But don’t sell green tomatoes short!  They have a flavour all their own, and they cook up fantastically. It’s funny really, we get so used to a food that we eat all the time, we forget that there might be other ways to go about it. In fact, in much of Asia, tomatoes are preferred when they’re in that just-barely-red phase, still tinged by green. On top of that, the growing popularity of heirloom varieties has done a lot to show people that there’s a lot more to life than the anemic mid-winter mealy globes that have passed for tomatoes all these years.

This simple pasta dish lets the bright, acidic flavour of the green tomatoes shine through against the contrasting umami-richness of the bacon, prawns, and cheese. It’s already a fairly healthy dish (for pasta, bacon, and cheese anyway), but you could always try a good turkey bacon if you wanted to reduce the fat further.

Inspired by this recipe from Jolene George at the Oregonian.

Recipe Notes

There’s nothing too complicated going on here – the whole thing comes together in a snap.

While I wrote fettuccine in the ingredient list, the pasta I used here is fettucce, which is a broad form of fettuccine. But nobody (including spellcheck) seems to know what fettucce is, and I didn’t want everyone thinking it was a typo. But hey, if you can find it, it’s a nice change. You can use any long pasta that you like; linguine or bucatini would be lovely.

As for the tomatoes, these are green UNRIPE tomatoes. I’m making the distinction because (at least where I live) green heirloom tomato varieties are becoming more and more common. While these tomatoes are amazing, beautiful, and delicious, they’re not what you’re looking for here. The idea with using unripe tomatoes is to showcase their somewhat acidic, grassy flavour against the rich bacon and cheese.

Grana padano cheese is my go-to here, but a good parmigiano-reggiano is lovely too. You could experiment with other aged, hard, glutamate-rich cheeses as well.


Nutrition Facts
Fettuccine with Green Tomatoes, Bacon, and Prawns
Amount Per Serving
Calories 572 Calories from Fat 153
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 17g 26%
Saturated Fat 5g 25%
Trans Fat 0.04g
Polyunsaturated Fat 2g
Monounsaturated Fat 7g
Cholesterol 109mg 36%
Sodium 941mg 39%
Potassium 596mg 17%
Total Carbohydrates 64g 21%
Dietary Fiber 4g 16%
Sugars 8g
Protein 32g 64%
Vitamin A 13%
Vitamin C 33%
Calcium 11%
Iron 27%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

Nutritional Summary

GOOD NEWS:
Dishes like this prove that you can cook with calorie-rich (and often maligned) ingredients like bacon and pasta without creating an over-the-top dinner disaster.  The bacon is used judiciously and a lot of fat is drained away, while the overall presentation doesn’t rely heavily on oil, cream, cheese, or any of the other trappings of unhealthy pasta dishes.  High in protein and nutrients, this makes a very hearty, yet fairly healthy meal.

BAD NEWS:
Bacon, even when used carefully and cooked properly, still adds a fair bit of sodium and saturated fat to a meal.  Make sure not to undercook the bacon, as this yields an end product with a lot more fat.

Ingredient Pages

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5 from 5 votes
Fettucce with green tomatoes, bacon, and prawns - Diversivore.com
Fettuccine with Green Tomatoes, Bacon, and Prawns
Prep Time
10 mins
Cook Time
20 mins
Total Time
30 mins
 

When life gives you green tomatoes, make pasta. That's the expression, right? Well if this amazing recipe is any indication, it should be!

Course: Main Dishes, Pasta & Noodles
Cuisine: European, Italian
Servings: 4 servings
Calories: 572 kcal
Ingredients
  • 200 g prawns (~10 16/20 count)
  • 200 g bacon
  • 1/2 white onion finely diced
  • 3 cloves garlic minced
  • 1/2 cup white wine (dry)
  • 1 1/2 cups green tomatoes diced
  • 1/4 tsp oregano
  • 1/4 tsp crushed chilies
  • 1/2 tsp salt (or to taste)
  • olive oil (high quality)
  • grana padano (or parmesan)
  • black pepper (freshly ground)
  • 300 g fettuccine (or linguine)
Instructions
  1. Peel and devein the shrimp, cut into 1 inch pieces and set aside.
  2. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. While cooking the sauce, prepare the pasta as instructed on the packaging.
  3. Dice the bacon into ½ cm pieces. Heat a large, heavy skillet over medium-high and cook the bacon until crispy. Remove with a slotted spoon and drain.
  4. Pour off all but 1 tablespoon of the bacon fat. Reduce the heat to medium and add the onions and garlic to the pan and cook until translucent but not browned, about 1-1.5 minutes. Be careful to avoid burning.
  5. Add the white wine, oregano, crushed chilies, and the tomatoes to the pan and stir to combine.
  6. Add the shrimp and simmer over medium heat until pink and just cooked through, 3-4 minutes.
  7. Remove the sauce from heat and stir in a generous pour of olive oil (a ‘grassy’ or greener tasting olive oil works beautifully).
  8. Serve the sauce over a bed of pasta, garnished with fresh pepper and a good quantity of grated grana padano or parmesan. If you like a bit more heat, feel free to add some more crushed chilies.

Comments

  1. Did you ever read the Little House of the Prairie series? For years I thought that Ma cooking with green tomatoes was some sort of magic. I guess not… I really never think about using them but if anything can convince me to try a new ingredient, it’s a pasta dish!

    1. Author

      I didn’t read it myself, but that’s cool to know! In any case, most people still avoid green tomatoes, so perhaps the magic is in getting people to actually try them!

  2. I couldn’t comment on such a beautiful and delicious pasta dish! I know fettucce, but yes, not very common and people would think of a misspelling. Agree, linguine would be a great choice here. The flavors work very well together, I like that you chose something more acidic like the green tomatoes to counterbalance the richness of the bacon and cheese, and the sweetness of the prawns. Plus, they are a beautiful variety of tomatoes, glad to see them used. You have quite a few Italian inspired recipes on your blog. Great job, Sean!

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