Garland Chrysanthemum

(Tong Ho)

Glebionis coronaria


BASICS & HOW-TO

CULINARY INFO

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BASICS & HOW-TO

BEST BET: ASIAN GROCERY STORES.

Garland chrysanthemum is fairly common in East Asian grocery stores when in season.

In the event that you can’t find garland chrysanthemum, it is easy to grow in cooler climates. Numerous seed companies offer multiple varieties for the home gardener, however it is worth noting that the plant will flower quickly and become overly bitter and unpalatable if grown in the summer.



CULINARY INFO

The flavour of garland chrysanthemum greens can be a little difficult to describe – mainly because the best comparison is to say that they taste like a leafy green mixed with chrysanthemum. This might sound a little meaningless unless you’ve had chrysanthemum teas or tisanes, but suffice it to say that the semi-floral flavour is much more distinctive than what you’d find in many mild salad greens. While the flavour is distinctive and relatively strong, it is by no means overwhelming. The stalks and larger leaves are fairly textural, holding up well to cooking and retaining good flavour. Older leaves and stalks will have a more pronounced and more aggressive flavour, while very young greens are comparatively mild (to the point that they can even be used raw in salads and the like).

Because the unique flavour of garland chrysanthemum holds up well to cooking (even in broths and liquids) it is a very popular green in Asian hot pots and stews.



MORE INFO

Garland chrysanthemum is low in calories, and moderately low in calcium and Vitamins A and C. It is however exceptionally high in Vitamin K.



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