Jerusalem Artichoke

Helianthus tuberosus


BASICS & HOW-TO

CULINARY INFO

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BASICS & HOW-TO

BEST BET: FARMERS’ MARKETS, WELL-STOCKED GREEN GROCERS.

Jerusalem artichokes have seen an uptick in popularity in recent years, and have become somewhat more common in grocery stores.  They can often be found in farmers’ markets or locally-focused grocers, as they help fill the winter produce gap.

Jerusalem artichokes are easy to grow in many different regions, and can be a very low-maintenance home crop.  That being said, be cautious – the plants can be incredibly pernicious, bordering on weedy.  Make sure you really like them before you grow them, as you may never get rid of them.

Jerusalem artichokes are in season from very late fall to early spring.



CULINARY INFO

Jerusalem artichokes have a rather unique and distinctive (though relatively mild) nutty taste, so it is difficult to accurately describe their flavour.  When raw, they are sometimes compared to Brazil nuts.  They have a slightly waxy starch profile, somewhat akin to a fingerling potato, only much crisper.  Where they depart significantly from other roots and tubers is their sweetness; high levels of the carbohydrate inulin give Jerusalem artichokes a pronounced sweetness.


MORE INFO

Jerusalem artichokes are high in vitamin C (94% d.v.)
and the insoluble fiber inulin.



RECIPES

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  • Winter gumbo with crab, andouille sausage, Jerusalem artichoke, kale, and golden beets - Diversivore.com
    Winter Gumbo with Crab, Andouille Sausage, & Sunchokes
    What do you do when you want hearty winter gumbo AND you want to keep things local and seasonal? Well, this. Crab, Andouille sausage, sunchokes, and much more.